AGE in PLACE- WHERE?

“Aging in Place” has become a preference I often hear from clients. It is usually shorthand for a fear of spending last days in an institution like a nursing home.

The reality, as shown by joint study done by an investment firm and AgeWave, shows many seniors have already moved or planned to move to a place they will own – a newer home with modern appliance, no steps, and much less maintenance, such as a condominium. And why are they moving? As reported by Caring Right At Home, a major supplier of home health care, many move to be closer to family (29%), reducing home expenses (26%) and because of changes in their health (17%).

It is not just “downsizing” but what I call “right sizing”, as people realize the large house with stairs and a lawn to maintain isn’t necessary after the kids have left. Because of modern medicine, we are living longer and tend to be more active – not just my grandparents sitting on the porch in a rocking chair. Why spend the time maintaining a home?

Regardless of location, the majority of seniors want long-term care in their home for as long as they are able, so watch for the continued growth of the home care agency. Since, in Ohio, licensing is not required, check out carefully the experience and customer satisfaction stats for any potential caregiver, or see us about making a family member that designated person. Live until you die!

PLANNING FOR CHRONIC ILLNESS

Sayings are repeated because they contain some real truth. Two that I often repeat to clients are: “Life is what you experience while you are planning other things” and, in contrast, “Failure to plan Is  planning to fail”. Both contain truth and apply when you or a spouse receive a diagnosis of a long term and perhaps fatal, chronic illness.

 

Aside from the personal sorrow and fear when the diagnosis comes, we need to be responsible for those in our families who will be involved in care-giving and care decisions. That is done with a thorough review of the health prognosis, evaluation of assets, projected care costs, and projected impact on the family. Elder law attorneys (like us) are used to dealing with these complicated questions and helping families find the right answers for them. Frequently, it may mean modification of a house for wheelchairs and access, changing the registration of title and accounts, moving to a single-floor residence, adding on a suite to a child’s home, preparing care agreements, setting up trusts for long-term care, investigating financial resources, including Medicaid and veterans benefits, identifying care-givers, and, most of all – making the best of the situation for all the loved ones who will be affected.

 

There are answers but usually not ones you can “do yourself”, because the issues are complicated. We look forward to talking with you in a no-cost initial conference that can lead to the best answers.

Dotty’s Ten Tips for communication with a person living with Dementia

1. Do you know what makes me feel secure? A smile
2. Did you ever consider? When you get uptight it makes me feel tense and uptight.
3. Instead of getting all bent out of shape when I do something that seems perfectly normal to me and perfectly NUTTY to you. Just smile at me it takes the edge off the situation.
4. Please try to understand and remember my short term memory is gone – don’t talk so fast, or use so many words.
5. When you use one of those long winded explanations of me- I’ll say No because I can’t tell what you are asking me to do. Keep your words few and simple so I can follow you.
6. Slow down. Don’t sneak up on me and start talking. Did I mention I like smiles?
7. Make sure you have my attention before you start blabbering away. If you don’t have my attention, I’ll be confused and say NO.
8. My attention span and ability to pay attention are not so good, please make eye contact with me before you start talking. A nice smile always gets my attention. Did I mention that before?
9. Sometimes you talk to me like I’m a child or idiot. How would you like it is I did that to you? Go to your room and think about this. Don’t come back and tell me you are sorry, I won’t know what you are talking about. Just stop doing it and we will get along.
10. You talk too much – instead try taking my hand and leading the way. I need a guide not a person to nag me.

Resource: Alzheimer’s Reading Room

Elder Attorneys – They Do WHAT?

I have been asked on occasion what an “elder attorney” does. Good question. Just as we know doctors have different knowledge bases and practice specialties, so do attorneys. An elder law attorney is one who has focused on the problems presented by aging: long-term care, asset preservation, disability, estate planning, tax planning, and business succession are some of the major areas. These are complex subjects and legal requirements don’t fit together in a nice, neat, logical way. I describe the process as sometimes leading clients through a mine field, carefully stepping on a path that leads to destruction. Is it only for our elders? – NO! -because the sandwich generation, which often has to deal with parent or uncle/aunt problems, is intimately involved in the day-to-day issues of a loved one. It is an ultimate expression of Christian love when one can remove some of the doubt and confusion from the life of a senior. That’s what we feel called to do. Blessings, Tim